I want to live, laugh, and wear vivid blouses

vinebox:

She wasnt ready

freddiefrowns:

that one female character that a lot of people hate and when questioned they all say “we would hate them if they were a guy too!!”

buT YOU KNOW

YOU KNOW THAT IS A PACK OF LIES

poisoncage:

yeah so i just saw smaug desolation last night XD

poisoncage:

yeah so i just saw smaug desolation last night XD

ugly:

look at this dog

ugly:

look at this dog

kotakucom:

This is how students at a South Korean school responded to the principal’s decision to ban cosplay during their graduation photo shoot.

Dialogue Should Move the Story Forward, Provide Information, or Enhance Characterization, Unless You’re Really Witty

The best dialogue can do all three. This is a rule that’s often broken by great writers, but before you can get away with breaking it, you have to understand why it exists. Recently, I reread one of my first stories. I thought it would be fun to reread, but I was disappointed in much of the dialogue. In the middle of a scene, my heroine Mildred and the housekeeper broke into an exchange about what my heroine wanted for dinner. I think they were the only two people in the world who cared about it. Readers never even got to see them eat this dinner, and the exchange had no point. It didn’t advance the plot, and it told us nothing about Mildred except that she hated sour beef and dumplings.

But let’s say you’re writing a romantic mystery where several people are poisoned by arsenic in the sour beef and dumplings. Suddenly that exchange becomes crucial because the reader knows Mildred was spared because she didn’t like the dish — does this mean the killer poisoned that dish because he didn’t want her to die? Or let’s say the point of the scene is that Mildred’s late father is a famous chef whose specialty was sour beef and dumplings, and Mildred confesses that no longer eats this dish because it brings back too many memories. Now the scene tells us something about Mildred’s personality, not just about her food intake. It wouldn’t take much work to use this exchange to move the plot forward while telling us something about Mildred and sharing the information about the food she likes.

Are you a witty author? Are you sure? If so, then you can get away with writing dialogue that doesn’t advance the plot, doesn’t tell us anything about the character, and doesn’t provide information to the reader. But even if you can get away with it, why should you do this? Even the most sparkling dialogue won’t help your story if it’s completely empty of anything but wit.

Anne Marble, Writing Romantic Dialogue (via cleverhelp)

snorlaxatives:

snorlaxatives:

snorlaxatives:

i can’t imagine people seeing the 50 shades of grey movie and feeling comfortable like the theaters will probably filled with horny middle aged women that is a very uncomfortable thought 

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OMFGSDBFSfhkjas

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I’M SCREAMING